Dark Purple Disease Affecting New Growth?

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Bobrown14

Bobrown14

There are other cash crops that also have phytoplasma diseases as well. Soy, rice etc.

Probably not the best view looking forward as global temps rise since these diseases like the warmer weather. But that is likely due to the insect vector also thriving in a hotter drier climate.

Insects taking over the world....

akakak mars attack.jpg
 
Jmaes Mabley

Jmaes Mabley

Even as far back as 1998

Phytoplasmas were found in Alfa Alfa crops in Wisconsin, and were infected. at a rate of23.5%. And this was just testing 1 crop, which I imagine is one of their bigger crops.
Logically bugs, being bugs ect, I know, mites aint bugs, but as research says most of the infection will come from leafhoppers as they are much more plentiful vs more varied climates. BMs don't do well surviving cold, but if you believe things are getting warmer overall, the bugs from the tropics ( Observed ) are on the march north, and are going to bring all kinds of shit with them.
America Elm is also 1 of the main ways insects ect, get infected.

A survey was conducted during September to November, 1998 to determine the incidence of phytoplasma in alfalfa plantings. Samples were obtained from fields near Arlington, Evansville, Marshfield, West Madison, Lancaster, Whitewater, Hancock and a growers field west of Madison. Samples consisted of growing tips from upper regions of plants. Samples were placed into labeled plastic bags and then placed in Styrofoam coolers for return to UW-Madison upon which samples were frozen at -20EC. Samples were processed by extraction of DNA using the protocol of (Zhang et al. 1998). This process separates the DNA (which contains the genes we are interested in) from the rest of the plant material. After the purified DNA was obtained, nested PCR (polymerase chain reaction) was carried out using two universal primer pairs according to the protocol of Gunderson and Lee (1996). The PCR process allows us to detect the DNA from only the phytoplasmas present in a sample and distinguishes phytoplasma DNA from all the other types of DNA present in the sample (such as plant, bacteria, and fungal DNA). This new technique (PCR) is costly and time-consuming, but allows us to detect organisms such as phytoplasmas in alfalfa (and other crops) which have probably been present in plantings for many years, but were very difficult to detect with traditional methods. For further classification of phytoplasmas, restriction enzyme digests were performed (the phytoplasma DNA was cut with enzymes) and comparison of RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphisms) were made with known patterns described by Lee et al. (1998). In other words, after we cut the phytoplasma DNA with enzymes, the patterns that were produced were compared with patterns of other phytoplasmas from around the world to further identify what phytoplasmas we are dealing with in Wisconsin.

Results indicated that phytoplasmas or organisms closely related to phytoplasmas are widespread in alfalfa plantings in Wisconsin (see Table 1).

Table 1. Incidence of samples PCR-positive for phytoplasma in Wisconsin.



Location

Number of samples

Number of samples PCR-positive for phytoplasma

Percent of samples PCR-positive for phytoplasma

Arlington

6

4

67

Evansville

6

1

17

Marshfield

7

2

29

West Madison

21

0

0

Lancaster

3

2

67

Whitewater

2

1

50

Hancock

3

0

0

Grower=s field west of Madison

3

2

67

TOTAL

51

12

23.5
 
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Jmaes Mabley

Jmaes Mabley

American Elm, is a Vector for Phytoplasmas. Its also the most common shade tree.



A phytoplasma from the group provisionally named 'Candidatus Phytoplasma ulmi' causes elm yellows.

Host plants

Several native elm (Ulmus) species including American (Ulmus americana), slippery (U. rubra), and winged elm (U. alata) are susceptible to elm yellows.

Description

Elm yellows symptoms begin in mid to late summer with the chlorosis and drooping of petioles of turgid leaves and premature leaf loss. Generally, symptoms abruptly appear within a few weeks and are visible throughout the crown, but occasionally yellowing will begin on scattered branches and over a couple of years spread throughout the crown. In some situations, trees wilt and die quickly without prior symptoms. Within lower branches the inner bark (phloem) yellows (instead of the normal white color), then develops tan flecks, and eventually dies.


The smell of wintergreen is present in the inner bark/phloem tissues of living American and winged elm infected with elm yellows. On the other hand, the inner bark of slippery elm with elm yellows smells like maple syrup.

Disease Cycle

The entire process of spread and infection by the elm yellows phytoplasma is yet unclear. The white-banded elm leafhopper (Scaphoideus luteolus) is a known carrier of the phytoplasma, while other leafhoppers and spittlebugs can transmit the disease to test plants. The elm yellows phytoplasma persists in the roots of American elm. When new growth begins in the spring, insect carriers acquire the phytoplasma when they feed on young shoots of infected elms. Later when these carriers feed on a healthy tree, they introduce the elm yellows phytoplasma into it. In addition, transmission of elm yellows occurs via root graft connections between diseased and healthy trees. The elm yellows phytoplasma incubates for several months in small trees and up to a year in large trees before symptoms of infection are evident.

Management Strategies

There is no way to prevent or cure elm yellows phytoplasma infections. Remove infected trees. Grow Asian and European elms in areas where elm yellows is present.
 
Jmaes Mabley

Jmaes Mabley

I emailed the lady at the Lab in California.

I sent her some of the photos posted here, and asked if she could identify the disease, without a test, of I don't see why she couldn't, if she has seen it before, and is supposed to be a scientist ect. Though I know a PCR test is the ultimate verification. But if you know what it is, you know what it is. If ya don't, ya don't.

Maybe I will hear back from her.
 
Jmaes Mabley

Jmaes Mabley

Heres the answer I got back.


Although I would love to help you with this, no one should even TRY to tell you what this is without a test or more information.

I’ve been a plant pathologist for 35 years and that’s the fastest way to go out of business or be sued. I would be willing to talk to you, but time is my commodity. If you purchased an hour of my time on the website I would be happy to go over this with you in detail, at least give you some direction, and we may be able to solve it

Thank you,

Dr. Heather Vallier
 
Bobrown14

Bobrown14

Started looking into similar issues with other trees and plants. Since I started to have issues with plant health similar to what I've seen here AFTER I started using rain water for watering indoors.

In our neighborhood the streets are lined with Sycamore trees. They all are sickly looking. I've had 3 cut down on my property in the last 10 years - they were dying. Turns out they are all infected with some sort of pathogen called Sycamore Anthracnose. Its a fungus of some sort.

Thankfully I only used rainwater on cuts/clones. But I started seeing health issues and rooted cuts start dying for no reason. Some of the cuts exibit similar issues when still alive. New shoots turning red and necrosis with weird growth = spiraling etc .

Whats that doctors fee for 1 hour of time??
 
basscaptain

basscaptain

If I was reading it right it's on her web site??? ... I'm going to send a link to this to JA a brother from a diff mother in nor ca see what he thinks, he knows a plant pathologist
 
kalopatchkid

kalopatchkid

Heres the answer I got back.


Although I would love to help you with this, no one should even TRY to tell you what this is without a test or more information.

I’ve been a plant pathologist for 35 years and that’s the fastest way to go out of business or be sued. I would be willing to talk to you, but time is my commodity. If you purchased an hour of my time on the website I would be happy to go over this with you in detail, at least give you some direction, and we may be able to solve it

Thank you,

Dr. Heather Vallier
Appropriate response. A misdiagnosis without actual testing could easily cost her her business as well as the farmers.

We've been discussing this problem on IC since 2016 and it has yet to be identified. It's clearly not something you can just look at photographs and assume its this or that. Some actual science is necessary here and not just casual discussion on a canna forum
 
Jimster

Jimster

Supporter
I saw a post on an European Cannabis site that had very similar issues, although the plants didn't look distorted, just new purple growth. It was attributed to being a "purple" strain, but I've never seen new growth that was purple like the ones being discussed here and the ones in Europe. If desired, I can find a link.
 
Jmaes Mabley

Jmaes Mabley

Heck Yeah!!! All pertinent info is greatly appreciated.

And 1 thing is for sure. It aint PH, or fertilizer issue. Or lack thereof. This shit is basically death. If it comes out of it, its never really the same. Some of my buddies recovers some, but most just becomes necrotic. No way Id smoke it.

I also wouldn't have cared if she just made a professional geuss, with the understanding its just guessing without the test. But her time, is her money, so I fully understand. Ethically too.
 
Jmaes Mabley

Jmaes Mabley

That was my first assumption, hopefully the data sheet is legible and not full of non-standardized jargon. In which case consulting fees apply.

I can chip in if you want to send a sample.

I would, but I have some other things I have to spend money on. It is going to have to eventually be done though.
 
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