how much are dispensaries paying for a pound?

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geologic

geologic

Old Pharmer
Supporter
@geologic You know your definition is bogus when it comes from the state of California and has 10,000 words to define it. Another words, bureaucratic B.S. I will stick with the universal, used by all people of the world, definition. Thanks for the post though.
The correct number of words in the definition is 320,
9,680 less than yer bombasticism;
next time you're in court have your lawyer
use yer Internet Dictionary,
instead of Black's Law Dictionary--
all them pesky definitions an' all...
 
Bulldog11

Bulldog11

The correct number of words in the definition is 320,
9,680 less than yer bombasticism;
next time you're in court have your lawyer
use yer Internet Dictionary,
instead of Black's Law Dictionary--
all them pesky definitions an' all...
You do realize I was exaggerating, and you actually took the time to count the words...... Kind of lame dude.

My point remains, my definition is in Websters, the most used dictionary on the planet. Your definition was wrote up by a team of California lawyers. Once again, I will take the definition used by all people in the world, over the period of the entire human history. However you can go with what the lawyers wrote up over the last decade. If I find my self in court defending whether or not this is a drought, then in that case you MIGHT be right. In any other common sense situation, the definition I posted is right. Sorry, lawyers suck and you would have to be a fool to go off a lawyers definition of anything. Like I said before, bureaucratic B.S. 100%.

Honestly Geo, are you serious with this? Are you really having a hard time with the simple definition of "drought." They have really done a number on your mind. We both have expressed our point of view on what a drought is, so no reason to continue to beat that dead horse. However, maybe you could tell me what it would take to get out of the drought? How much rain? Blaze says it could take up to centuries. What's your take?
 
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Smokey503ski

Smokey503ski

Click on my username, a box should pop up. Then click "start a conversation." It took me a full minute to figure it out, too!
Or just go to start conversation and type a few letters of their name and it will give you a list, the more you type the more it narrows it.
 
markscastle

markscastle

Well-Known Farmer
There is a sign on a farmer`s land south of Chico, (HWY 99) that reads " Food grows where water flows" this is true of cannabis as well. It`s looking a little better next year for me but I`m cutting down the size of my crop by half anyway. Even if I get the water It is just to much work harvesting for me by myself any more. I figure If I have more root room and water I may still have near the same yield with a little less work? Also more room between plants in the greenhouses can`t hurt in other ways. I`m working on better water retention and supply as well. If we all planted less we would reap more, more is less!
 
wobbly goblin

wobbly goblin

"
The series of storms impacting the West Coast this week will be a bit different than what the region has experienced in recent months. This go around, even Southern California can expect a decent helping of much-needed rain and mountain snow. For parts of the Siskiyous and Sierra, as well as parts of the Four Corners, expect hefty amounts of snow to pile up through the week ahead.
This will add to a Sierra snowpack that is much more substantial than at the same point last year. According to the USDA/NRCS, through Jan. 1, 2016, the Sierra snowpack was 100 percent or more of average for the season."

from the weather channel
fwiw
 
Bulldog11

Bulldog11

It was 135% of average snow pack last week. Still not enough rain and snow to stop the drought but It`s going in the right direction. Every drop counts! Mostly we need the ground water to return to normal now!
I think the correct way to say that, IMO, is the drought is over, lets hope enough water falls to recover our reservoirs. Which if our governments don't squander the rain, California will continue have plenty of water.

However, I did like the fact that my packs sold faster and for more money this year. Hope the scare talk of the drought continues to raise the prices for next season.

Just my opinion.
 
markscastle

markscastle

Well-Known Farmer
The reservoirs have a long ways before they will be full again but that`s not what worries me the most. I don`t take much advantage of that water as it is shipped down south. I`m more worried about ground water. I get my water from a spring and hope to drill a well at some point. It could take years for the recovery of ground water. It seems to be in the worst shape of everything. The bad is know one knows how to help it along. Flooding large pools of water over great amounts of land doesn`t really look like something that`s going to be doable. Only land available for this would be rice farms. But while they can be planted while flooded, they need to dry up for harvesting. California has taken a big hit, mostly in agriculture. It will be some time before we can produce like we used to. It will take years alone before any newly planted orchards produce. We will need to shift to other crops in many places. But even this will be in the past at some point. As for cannabis prices they may continue to raise for the next couple years slightly but should rebound much faster than tree crops. We`ll just have to see what happens. A lot depends on how our state and local governments handle things. I`m less hopeful of government working right than the weather myself.
 
Seamaiden

Seamaiden

Living dead girl
I think the correct way to say that, IMO, is the drought is over, lets hope enough water falls to recover our reservoirs. Which if our governments don't squander the rain, California will continue have plenty of water.

However, I did like the fact that my packs sold faster and for more money this year. Hope the scare talk of the drought continues to raise the prices for next season.

Just my opinion.
I'm curious how your county is responding to the state's new legislation. My county has responded by making cultivation even more difficult and restrictive, and they've now made violation of ordinances a misdemeanor with financial penalty and/or jail time.
 
jumpincactus

jumpincactus

Premium Member
Supporter
The reservoirs have a long ways before they will be full again but that`s not what worries me the most. I don`t take much advantage of that water as it is shipped down south. I`m more worried about ground water. I get my water from a spring and hope to drill a well at some point. It could take years for the recovery of ground water. It seems to be in the worst shape of everything. The bad is know one knows how to help it along. Flooding large pools of water over great amounts of land doesn`t really look like something that`s going to be doable. Only land available for this would be rice farms. But while they can be planted while flooded, they need to dry up for harvesting. California has taken a big hit, mostly in agriculture. It will be some time before we can produce like we used to. It will take years alone before any newly planted orchards produce. We will need to shift to other crops in many places. But even this will be in the past at some point. As for cannabis prices they may continue to raise for the next couple years slightly but should rebound much faster than tree crops. We`ll just have to see what happens. A lot depends on how our state and local governments handle things. I`m less hopeful of government working right than the weather myself.
Agreed, Mark was reading somewhere that NASA predicts around 11 trillion gallons of water will be needed to come anywhere near what you all need to recover. Not sure if El Nino will pull that off. But it is a start. Much good karma and vibes to all of those affected by this drought. Thing is most don't realize that its not only Cali farmers that are affected. The ripple effect will be felt nationwide.
 
jumpincactus

jumpincactus

Premium Member
Supporter
I'm curious how your county is responding to the state's new legislation. My county has responded by making cultivation even more difficult and restrictive, and they've now made violation of ordinances a misdemeanor with financial penalty and/or jail time.
This is the type of restriction and regulation that really gets my hackles up. Dont get me wrong we all have to do our part in water conservation. But I would posture why is it it is typically only the small fry in the pond that get whacked with fines and regulations while corporate entities get to be more wasteful than anyone on the planet.

I was just reading this the other day and I just shook my head and thought this must really piss your Cali folks right the F^^^ off. Will this type of insanity ever cease.

Despite Worst Drought In 1200 Years, Nestlé Gets Caught Stealing Water From Calif. Forests

http://reverbpress.com/business/des...ts-caught-stealing-water-calif-forests-video/
 
Seamaiden

Seamaiden

Living dead girl
That Nestle shit is the fault of the Forest Service. I think the only reason their permits are being re-examined is because of the public outcry. That said, almost EVERYONE down there gets their water from very deep and large aquifers. The city of La Habra Heights owns a massive well in the city of La Mirada, and they sell that extremely clear, alkaline water to profit the city.

I bet LHH isn't coming down as hard on cultivators as Amador Co is, too.
 
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